Interest-Based Problem-Solving is at the heart of High Performance through Engagement (HPtE #13)

It is estimated that employees spend 42% of their time engaging in or attempting to resolve conflict and 20% of Managers time is consumed with conflict related issues.

Masters and Albright (2002), in The Complete Guide to Conflict Resolution in the Workplace, point out that people thrive on conflict in most areas of their lives–football games, political debates, legal disputes–yet steer clear from workplace conflicts. But conflict is actually a healthy way to challenge the existing order and essential to change in a workplace.

The real problem is not conflict per se, but managing conflict.

Dana (2001), in Conflict Resolution: Mediation Tools for Everyday Work Life, argues  that workplaces are changing. As interpersonal rules of conduct become looser and time deadlines become tighter, conflict resolution is gaining importance as a strategic management issue.  

Organisations that recognise the necessity of strategically managing internal conflict will be one step ahead in increasingly competitive business environments.

Cloke and Goldsmith (2011), in Resolving Conflicts at Work: Ten Strategies for Everyone on the Job, reveal how the inevitable disputes and divisions in the workplace are actually opportunities for greater creativity, productivity, enhanced morale, and personal growth.

Clearly, confronting and managing organisational conflicts presents a major challenge to organisations that wish to successfully compete in today’s global economy.

In order to reduce the competition and conflict over allocation of time and money some form of decision making process capable of finding solutions that can meet the interests of Shareholders (Commercial Responsibility), Operations and CI (Consumer Value) and Workers (a safe, secure and satisfying Culture), is required.

Interest-Based Problem-Solving meets that need.

But, what is Interest-Based Problem Solving?

Interest-Based Problem-Solving is an outcome of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution, and was captured by Fisher, Ury and Patton (1981) in their book Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In.

Getting to Yes offers a proven, step-by-step strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict. The four key principles of Interest-Based Problem-Solving are:

  1. Separate the people from the problem.
  2. Focus on interests, not positions.
  3. Generate a variety of possibilities before deciding what to do.
  4. Insist that the result be based on some objective standard. 

By embedding these problem solving principles into the decision making processes within any organisation the conflict between the 3C’s is not only reduced but harnessed for greater creativity, productivity, enhanced morale, and personal growth.

This is a key to unlocking sustainable high performance in any organisation.

HPtE Practitioner Site Update + A NEW summary page for fast navigation

So far I have published 10 posts explaining the foundation of the HPtE Strategy™ Framework. I trust that you have found them valuable. There is much more to come.

The framework was researched and created to introduce, explain and help implement a High Performance through Engagement initiative. It is a framework to talk about High Performance through Engagement with CEO’s, Senior Leaders, HR Teams, Union Leaders, Consultants, Practitioners and, most importantly, the people doing the frontline work.

I have recently made a few edits to make the blog series flow better when they are read together. Thank you to all those who have made suggestions.

To help you navigate the series I have also added a summary page so you can go back and refresh when you need to. Here is a link to the page: HPtE Strategy™ Framework

Thank you for the opportunity to be of service.

Regards,

Karl

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